three pairs of lovers with space

GREEK LOVE IN OCEANIA

 

Australia

The Fatal Shore by Robert Hughes gives several descriptions of pederasty as a common practise in the British convict settlements in late 18th and early 19th century Australia.

In the "scanty" section on Australia in their global survey of boy prostitution, Boys for Sale (1969), Drew and Drake briefly mention the foregoing pederasty described by Hughes, then conclude (p. 139):

 As Australian culture and civilization develop, boy prostitution declines. Now, it is largely confined (as far as we know) to amateurs and immigrant boys in a couple of the larger cities.

Parker Rossman's Sexual Experience between Men and Boys (1976) includes an interview with an American soldier who briefly described trysts with boys in Sydney at the time of the Vietnam War.

The Diaries of Donald Friend, IV covers the last years of this Australian artist 's life, 1966-89, but the Greek love references extracted almost entirely concern his time living in Bali.

The Man They Called a Monster is a sociologist’s study of a Brisbane man who kept meticulous records  over twenty years of the roughly 2500 mostly adolescent boys of varied social background he made love to, and not one of whom every complained to anyone. Based on these records and interviews conducted with both the man (before his suicide) and some of his former boys, the book offers priceless insight into how pederasty could be practised in the already fairly-repressive climate of Australia in the 1960s and 1970s.

 

Melanesia

The relatively far greater similarity in way of life between Melanesian tribes, as witnessed by 20th-century anthropologists, and prehistoric people everywhere in the very long hunter-gatherer period of human existence, and the prevalence of pederasty amongst them, means they offer far more credible insight than industrialised societies into the likely role of Greek love when human nature was formed.

The Kaluli of New Guinea and Papuans of the Trans-Fly were two of the many tribes of New Guinea where all pubescent boys were pedicated by the young men, such being considered essential to their growing-up.

Greek love in the Solomon Islands is a 1963-5 study of the sexual culture of an area where extra-marital heterosex was strongly taboo, but mutual pedication by adolescent boys and pedication of boys of seven to eleven by men, whether married or not, were widely practised and openly discussed.

 

Polynesia

Together with indigenous North America and parts of India and mainland South East Asia, Polynesia was one of the areas of the the world where gender-differentiated homosexuality flourished. According to this model, the passive partner in a homosexual liaison dressed and behaved like a woman, rather than being differentiated from his lover through boyishness versus manliness, as in Greek love. Generally, one of these forms of traditional homosexuality predominated over the other. In most of the world, and especially where Greek love was admired, the effeminate was despised, but in Polynesia, being a transvestite mahu was accepted as a way of life for a self-chosen few and dominated homosexuality in the popular imagination. As usual where this was the case, Greek love was tolerated as casual fun without becoming ubiquitous.

Greek love in Tahiti is an assembly of accounts by foreign travelers who stayed in Tahiti between 1789 and 1961.

The traditional sexual culture of the Marquesas Islands, including some Greek love was described by Robert Suggs in his Marquesan Sexual Behavior.